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Tag: Made

Dads’ Breakfast: Commit 998df0135f

From the Making of Dads’ Breakfast

HTTPS://CJWILLCOCK.CA/DADS-BREAKFAST-MAKING-OF/

You are welcome to view this commit via github, sourcehut, or author’s original.

I use two (2) flatscreen LCD monitors at my writing desk. Both monitors are 1080p and leave me some room around the default block widths in the Gutenberg editor. These have a maximum width of 31.77% of my viewing area. I’m looking for nearer to half as a minimum return on my monitor-dollar.

I preserve some negative space around the tableau but impose a little bit more room for tables and various things, by applying the following CSS to the editor:

@media (min-width: 1280px){
	.wp-block{
		max-width: 800px;
	}
}

@media (min-width: 1600px){
	.wp-block{
		max-width: 960px;
	}
}

With this change, on any screen with two-thirds (2/3) the horizontal resolution of a monitor like one of mine the block widths increase from 47.66% to five-eights (5/8) of the viewport width. At screens five-sixths (5/6) mine the block widths increase from the 41.69% of the viewport width imposed by the previous media query -up from 38.125% at default WP size- to three-fifths (3/5) of the viewport width.

The ratio of viewport width to block width changes as the viewport width increases. I’m keeping the tableau on desktop to a comfortable one-half (1/2) of a 1920 pixels wide viewport. YMMV.

Parallaxica

My Keyboard

The daily duo; my keyboard and mouse.

I acquired my Ergodox kit from Massdrop.

I have Colemak at power-on, Qwerty-toggle on the top-outermost index position on each hand, and a third layer, which I seldom use, for the right-hand numpad. It was 5 hours of soldering for an out-of-practice fellow like me. The hundred-and-some SMD diodes should be thrown far into the woods gave me some years back on my technique.

This purchase amounted to 350 USD in 2015.

Once the Ergodox was programmed and in daily use, I found no need to favour sore wrists.

After a short time spent considering how this fit in with my desk, my mouse snuck in between the two halves. There wasn’t room to the right, but that desk-estate in the middle there is lucky.

A larger desk, like my 2016 office desk would be better.

Also five keys for each hand and attached to my chair would be handy closer at hand handsome good for my posture.

I could type in sexagesimal chords.

On second thought, it would be six keys per hand, there being a palm button.

Better yet, palm trackball on the right with palm masher on the left (-click)!

Are you an aficionado of human-machine interaction builds? Post about your keyboard, etc. and mention this post so I can hear about yours.

mf2bench – Parse all the things (with all the parsers)

My Microformats2 parser passed all the tests a short while ago. After that milestone, I was wondering if it’s fast. That needs some context because fast compared to what? All the other Microformats2 parsers. Have they been measured? The answer to that one is: not before now as far as I can tell.

I took a little time to make mf2bench, a benchmarking tool that compares the performance of all (is it all?) the Microformats2 parsers out there. My work on the php-extension, mf2, came in second place in terms of speed, behind the Microformats2-parser for Go. I’m pretty happy with this, because I have been concentrated on coding to pass tests, to demonstrate that the parser meets the living specifications at microformats.org. Making it run fast, or as fast as is fun to make it, is still a little bit away.

I’ll next get mf2bench to provide some measure of what the parse from each parser is for the various samples. That will be neat.

 

========== UPDATE ==========

The above screenshot uses the default of three (3) parses per parser. It was captured for the sake of taking a picture, rather than of comparison between parsers, etc. Here is the same thing, with one hundred (100) parses per parser.

Versions of each parser tested:

Parser Version
ruby/microformats-ruby 4.1.0
python/mf2py 1.1.2
php/php-mf2 0.4.6
php/php-mf2 (w/ Masterminds\HTML5) 0.4.6 (2.5.0)
php-ext/mf2 unreleased
node/microformats-parser 2.0.1
go/microformats 0.1.26
perl/microformats2 0.5
elixir/microformats2 0.2.1
haskell/microformats2-parser 1.0.1.9

My microformats2 parser has reached a milestone. All of the mf-test-suite microformats2 tests now pass.

138 commits, 107 passing tests – source

I’ll complete the current mf-test-suite tests before moving on to expanding on those tests alongside the parser. Next up is backcompat parsing.

Now at thirty (30) thirty-one (31) passing tests for my microformats parser.Total includes twenty-four (24) twenty-five (25) core tests and six (6) from the microformats-test-suite.

My Microformats parser now has fifteen (15) passing tests, parses rels & rel-urls from the web, from local disk (via URI), and from code string.

Working on a new project, a microformats parser. Follow along at code.cjwillcock.ca. Discussion in #microformats on irc.freenode.net.

This was generated using free software I made with a colleague. The software is mwfractal (Moore-Willcock Fractal) and written in C++.

Gallery Test

Pancakes!

Time to make a new theme for cjwillcock.ca.

I forked my Psymantic theme and made a new theme, Pancakes. I’ll install it here, then make it less ugly. It’s going to break things, but not for long I expect.

Pancakes is also free software, because software wants to be free! Enjoy.

Lastly, a screenshot of what once was, for posterity. Shout out and kudos to David Shanske, the provider of the twentysixteen-indieweb theme I have used until now.

Via Lactea

Like the Milky Way .. sort of?

Meri

Sometimes it gets away from you a little bit, and you need to bring it back. But give it a good chunk of time before you CTRL+Z. You never know where you get to.

 

Super large, finished-for-now: meri.jpg

What Whale?

I like how the digitization and colouring has captured the physicality of the ink on the paper. See how it’s been over-inked?

Full-size sort of thing here: christopherjwillcock-whatwhale.jpg