WordPress has a feature to enable HTML5 support which doesn’t cover all the places where HTML5 support is needed.

add_theme_support('html5', array(
  'search-form',
  'comment-form',
  'comment-list',
  'gallery',
  'caption',
));

This is everything available ^^^. When adding inline styles to the HTML, which WordPress does automatically, there is no filter hook available to remove the type attribute from the style tags. We end up with this incorrect output:

<style type="text/css">…</style>

Allowing this to stay there won’t break anything, it’s very insignificant overall. However, my practice includes the method of no broken windows. Allowing this to stay, though it’s really out of my hands unless I abandon WordPress entirely, is anathema to me.

It’s important to experience the pain of a program done wrong, before we can appreciate the well-made version of the same. There isn’t time to fix everything and still get the job done. Eventually it’s time to directly address the cause, but not today.

What Am I Doing Now?

I made a little page that describes what I am doing now. It’s not what I am working on lately but is what I am doing at this moment, right now. See for yourself.

I decided not to reveal my precise location for privacy reasons. Instead, I show which watershed I am in. When away from home, this will also highlight my nearest community. It’s limited to my home Province of PEI for the moment.

Ex Lacuna or Bust

When I started writing online here again in early June ’18 I had no intention of using WordPress. Some conversation led to me using WordPress to help others that also use WordPress. I raced to the blogging that some others enjoy most and skipped the reading and implementing technical specifications that I enjoy most.

I have been hesitant to write about the details of the coding I do and about the decisions I make while developing software. I feel that very few people I know would enjoy reading that sort of content and therefore I hesitate to spend the time writing it. Instead I simply focus on the coding itself as time allows. Expanding the group of people I know and connecting with those that find these topics interesting was a primary motivator for me in coming back to blogging. Maybe ensuing conversations will make me a better developer and enable me to accomplish more. I like this possibility very much. However, in adopting the perspective of a non-developer using WordPress, I somehow fell into blogging from this perspective too.

Clearly, it’s not that WordPress is affecting me this way and I do not mean to say anything for or against this particular project or any individual that I have been chatting with on this. Rather, I see that by foregoing a journey of self-determination, making and using my own tools, I have rapidly arrived to a completely functional and reasonably well-appointed place which I was not in a hurry to be in. The journey continues to be the interesting thing for me.

I often encounter this mantra: don’t reinvent the wheel. I don’t like that there is no ‘depends on the situation’ disclaimer included there. Yes, in business, the rapidity of reaching the goal is a key quality to consider. I am not so constrained, 24×7.

Consider a farmer. The land is cleared, plowed, and planted. The crop is sown, nurtured, harvested, stored and brought to market. I expect there is more to it as well. I am not a farmer, but I expect a farmer to know these details. Consider now one who sells farm produce. I expect a produce vendor to not have detailed knowledge of farming. A junior produce vendor may hear from the senior vendors, “don’t reinvent the farm.” Makes sense if you are indeed pursuing a career in produce vending. A bit sad if the young person has the soul of a farmer, and stands at a fork in the path, where seeing clearly the farming and vending aspects coalesces to new and synergistic innovation in vendor-farmer systems.

It’s been my good fortune to secure a career which aligns with my lifelong pursuit and passion for systematization in computer programming. At work, I practice a disciplined approach to avoid costs: don’t reinvent the wheel. Outside of work, I pursue the goal of self-empowerment; of complete details as minimum viability. I study minor aspects of complex systems so that I might take personal responsibility for what I may recommend others to use, as components and dependencies. This naturally improves my day-to-day effectiveness. It is time consuming to do so, on my time, as desired!

In all the world of people in vocational specializations, when we go seeking the construction details of some modern, useful artifact, we must eventually find someone who speaks with authority, and does reference clear evidence when the question is asked: what is a wheel? I choose this vocation, software development. I think it reasonable for you to expect me to know the details.

This little funk I’m working through is all too similar to an earlier time, and to an important lesson I learned then – not to attempt to paint a picture of myself, based on what I think other people want to see of me, but instead to be genuine. It’s much easier.

Now back, back, back to knitting my own washcloth.